Driving Lessons

Driving Lessons: A Father, a Son, and the Healing Power of Golf
“For generations, fathers and sons have trudged emerald fairways together in a lacerating enterprise called golf. Steve Friedman does a marvelous job writing about one such improbable outing, in which nine holes of spirited hacking bridged an aching gap between him and his dad. Driving Lessons is a good read about a good walk, unspoiled.” — Carl Hiassen, author of The Downhill Lie: A Hacker’s Return to a Ruinous Sport

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“Steve Friedman may not be much of a golfer, but he’s one heck of a writer. Rarely have the joys and sorrows of the father-son-putter dynamic been so keenly observed.” — Mark Adams, author of Turn Right at Machu Picchu: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time

“A story as elegant and unforgettable as the arc of a perfectly hit golf ball on a summer afternoon.” — Bill Strickland, author of Ten Points

“You don’t need to know about five-irons or fairways to get a lot out of this bravely honest memoir. Every father or son will see himself in Steve Friedman’s story, and just possibly be moved to reach across the strained gap that separates one generation from the next.” — Benjamin Wallace, author of The Billionaire’s Vinegar

“Steve Friedman is one of the best American chroniclers of the intersections between ‘shallow’ sport and deep feeling, and in Driving Lessons he’s at the top of his game. Here it’s golf—a sport beloved by the author’s father and despised and resisted by the son for nearly a half-century—that brings these two very different men, despite tangled ambivalence and resentment on both sides, to appreciate each other. A frank, poignant, blessedly unsentimental little book about the way sport can serve, for a father and son divided by a common history, as a shared language.”— Michael Griffith, author of Spikes

* Read Gelf magazine’s Q&A with the author *

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